TEENAGE GIRLS IN UK AT CHLAMYDIA RISK

Teenage girls more at risk of contracting Chlamydia than older women

25 September, 2007

Teenage girls are more at risk of contracting sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) like Chlamydia than women in their 20s.

Important facts

  • 1 in 10 women and 1 in 8 men under the age of 25 tested positive for Chlamydia.
     
  • The infection can cause pelvic inflammatory disease and ectopic pregnancy in women and infertility in both men and women.
     
  • three quarters of those infected will not have any symptoms, and they will not seek medical help. Big trouble later on!
     
  • Protection - Use condoms! Always! Pills won't do.
     
  • Reverse trend in men - more older men than teen boys.

A research conducted by the Health Protection Agency of the United Kingdom has shown that girls aged 16 to 19 are 43% more likely to test positive for the infection than women who have had a new sexual partner or had sex with more than two people in the past one year.

External link: More on Chlamydia in women

Female Chlamydia pictures -- WARNING! Might gross you out! Totally NSFW

Of those interviewed, 44% of the women admitted having a new sexual partner in the preceding three months and/or two or more sexual partners in a year.

Unlike in women, the trend was reverse in men – with most men aged 20-24 years susceptible to the infection than the teenaged boys.

The first-year results of Britain’s National Chlamydia Screening Program, published in the journal Sexually Transmitted Infections, show that 1 in 10 women and 1 in 8 men under the age of 25 tested positive for Chlamydia.

The program is a part of a national initiative to tackle what has been a growing problem among young people in the United Kingdom.

The researchers said “new lessons are being learnt on the process and outcomes of opportunistic screening and methods for enhancing its implementation in a diverse range of healthcare settings. The National Chlamydia Screening program will undoubtedly continue to make inroads into the prevention and control of this infection in the United Kingdom.”

The infection can cause pelvic inflammatory disease and ectopic pregnancy in women and infertility in both men and women.

Chlamydia is also called a silent epidemic because three quarters of those infected will not have any symptoms, and they will not seek medical help and may suffer the dire consequences further down the line, as well as passing the disease on to any other sexual partners they may have in the meantime.

An important part of the National Chlamydia Screening Program’s work is education. Using condoms is advocated to increase protection against Chlamydia and other sexually transmitted diseases – though this in itself does not offer cent percent guarantee.

Reports say that, in western European countries where routine screening has been carried out for much longer, particularly Scandinavia, Denmark, and the Netherlands, Chlamydia infections have decreased over the last 15 years. In some instances, the condition has fell to near-zero, with a corresponding decrease in complication rates of pelvic infection and ectopic pregnancies.

 

 

 
     
 

 

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