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DEVICE FOR INCREASING BLOOD FLOW TO HEART 

New device inducing blood flow to heart granted US patent

 

BY OUR PHARMA  CORRESPONDENT

10 August, 2005: A new device which can induce arteries to grow through electric stimulation of heart muscles has been granted patent by the US Patent and Trademark Office.

This invention is based on research conducted by Dr Shinichi Kanno and Dr. Yasufumi Sato which is described in an article published in the journal Circulation in 1999 (Circulation. 1999;99:2682-2687). The article describes that when the patented electrical stimulation sequence is applied to ischemic muscle that it significantly increases capillary density, thus increasing blood flow in the tissue. 

Bioheart, the company which developed the device aims to repair damaged heart muscle with its MyoCell product, a myogenic cell composition made up of adult muscle stem cells called myoblasts. The new patent will allow the company to combine its MyoCell product with the said electrical stimulation sequence which could increase the blood supply to the transplanted cells and increase their survival. MyoCell is delivered to a patient's heart through the company's percutaneous needle injection catheter called the MyoCath. 

Bioheart has two additional patents pending for utilizing electrical stimulation to enhance the repair of damaged heart muscle. The company expects that these new electrical stimulation programs may be applied by bi-ventricular pacemakers to cell-transplanted regions of the heart in order to further improve patient outcomes. 

Bioheart, Inc. is sponsoring clinical trials of its MyoCell myogenic cell composition delivered via the MyoCath catheter for damaged heart muscle repair in the US and Europe.

Bioheart Inc.'s initial patient-derived cellular-based implant technology (MyoCell) harvests specially selected cells from a patientís own thigh muscle and utilizes that raw material to produce uniquely composed implants that are placed into the heart either percutaneously (via cardiac catheter) or surgically. The MyoCell therapy is designed to regenerate infarcted, scarred or non-functioning myocardial tissue into functioning muscle that contributes to increased global cardiac output and slows down the progression of CHF. With its demonstrated ability to positively impact the heart muscle remodeling process, it is expected that the market for MyoCell will include anyone who has suffered from a heart attack (myocardial infarction).

The company's scientific and research team has over 20 patents and patents pending related to the cellular treatment of a failing heart. Several of these discoveries have been validated in Current Good Laboratory Practices (cGLP) and Good Clinical Practice (CGP) settings for the therapeutic treatment of CHF patients. The companyís patent portfolio contains three patents pending related to the adaptation of bi-ventricular pacemakers to provide electrical stimulation to enhance angiogenesis and myogenesis.

BY OUR PHARMA  CORRESPONDENT

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